Tag Archives: ghost stories

Another Author’s Insight: Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)

Revising ought to be enjoyable. Your work is no longer a mountain toppling over you: it is under your hand. Your theme has proved feasible, has shaped up; crisis and climax are in their places; your characters have life in them, you know what their reactions would and would not be. You work in confidence, no longer apprehensive that your plot will prove unmanageable or that your characters will refuse to function or that your theme will turn out to have no play in it after all.
~Dorothy Macardle, The Uninvited, Chapter 13

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In the Best of Company.

TO THE HESITATING PURCHASER

If Irish tales and Irish tunes,
Ghosts and mystery, warmth and cold,
If shadows, starlight, and the moon,
And diamonds, rubies, and white gold,
And all the old romance, retold
Exactly in the ancient way,
Can please, as me they pleased of old,
The wiser readers of today:

–So be it, and fall on! If not,
If studious minds no longer crave,
Their ancient appetites forgot,
Austen, or “Currer Bell” the Brontë,
Or Cooper of the wood and wave:
So be it, also! And may I
And all my creatures share the grave
Where these and their creations lie!

(Adapted from a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson,
in his epigraph for Treasure Island.)

Click on QR Code to scan:

Hardback

Paperback Vol. 1

Paperback Vol. 2

 

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By Golly, It’s a Book!

As much as I loved the first printing of Irish Firebrands in paperback, there’s nothing quite like seeing it in hardbound form!

Two hardback copies of Irish Firebrands visit their friends in my Irish research bookcase. (The bookcase is made of real oak, five feet high, and there are two more full shelves to it; some of the shelves have two rows of books on them, and two more double-row shelves of Irish books live on the other side of the room, at my computer desk. Am I an anorak?)

The new dust cover makes an eye-catching presentation, whether it’s face up on a table, or spine outward on a shelf. The text is printed on cream paper in graceful Garamond font with American Uncial accents (chapter numbers, page headings and page numbers), and the lines are spaced at the classic distance for ease of reading. The boards are bound in dark-blue linen, with the spine labeled in gold leaf, and with its traditional frontispiece map (and a bonus central illustrated section to provide a brief intermission), it holds its own with the best that printing presses have produced for the past 200 years.

Although it has more pages, plus the flyleaves and linen-bound boards, it weighs the same as the single-volume soft cover, but this does not constitute the same kind of disadvantage that the weight and thickness give to a paperback, because the flexibility of a hardbound spine permits the book to lie flat when open on a reader’s lap or a table.

What I don’t like about it is what the list price is required to be, just in order for all of the retail outlet middlemen to take their cut. It’s in the same range as the list prices for a few of the newer hardcover First World War nonfiction books I’ve bought recently, but that’s a specialty subject. For fiction – even for a 200,000-word epic like Irish Firebrands – it seems artificially inflated, and at that, if any lovely reader does buy one from a hand-in-the-till retailer, I will net less than 3% of the list price.

The good news is that readers will be able to buy the hardbound printing of Irish Firebrands at the Lulu Store for a much more reasonable 20% off list (which results in a price more in line with traditionally published hard cover fiction), and I will receive a realistic return for all my work.

Indie Author-Publisher colleagues: I’ve begged you before, on behalf of readers like myself who have visual disabilities, to print your books in paperback as well as to publish them digitally. I renew that request here, and I present a challenge: Do yourselves a favor, and print deluxe editions of your works in hard cover, too. Treat your writing with the respect it deserves, by giving it a presentation of which you can be proud, and which will compete on equal terms with traditionally published fiction, in a format that will increase its endurance on a reader’s bookshelf.

Hardback. It doesn’t get any better than this.

Click HERE to shop at Lulu Press.

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