Tag Archives: soundtracks

Does Your Story Have Its Own Soundtrack?

We’ve talked about at the role that music plays in the story in fiction, as well as examined the Irish Trad music that accompanied much of the writing of Irish Firebrands, and ended up representing specific scenes in the story; we’ve also looked at the influence that Wagnerian music has in my background, and how it’s come to have a part in the writing of my work-in-progress, The Passions of Patriots.

I believe that the practice of listening to music throughout the process of writing Irish Firebrands was instrumental (no pun intended!) in preventing writer’s block. From what I’ve read at other Indie Authors’ blogs, if they write to music (vocal or instrumental), it’s to works that have distinctly identifiable artists, themes, genres, or cultural origins.

Today we’ll talk a little about tapping a source of music that’s not already identified with other particular forms or artists, and using that music to come up with a unique “soundtrack” for our own literary art.

Kevin MacLeod’s INCOMPETECH.COM is an excellent source for mood music to accompany any artistic endeavor – and he offers his compositions ROYALTY FREE. This is amazingly generous of the man, because what he’s got on his websites counts into the hundreds of works that range in length from just a few seconds, to the duration of a typical popular song, and even performances that rival the length and complexity of the movements of major orchestral works.

The great thing about MacLeod’s music is that it has no strings attached to other works of art, as do songs performed by vocalists, or the works of classical composers, or the soundtracks of motion pictures. The pieces you find on the website are simply snippets of feelings captured in sounds – a talent for musical expression at which MacLeod excels.

The works that appear at INCOMPETECH can be searched for genre, mood, and other qualities. All pieces have their own descriptive names, but they’re not labels that will necessarily interfere with the listener’s own interpretation of the music. This makes them valuable for constructing “soundtracks” to accompany the writing process. MacLeod often gives us the benefit of his creative impressions of many pieces, he usually lists the instruments (or choral accents) that are programmed into the performances, and he also provides suggestions for how to loop, mix, or otherwise manipulate much of the music. The tracks are downloadable in MP3 format.

I spent a few hours listening to and downloading selections that “spoke” to me: a 90-minute playlist to accompany my creation of The Passions of Patriots. This new collection makes the third set of inspiring musical works I’ve collected to help me visualize scenes and give cadence to dialogue for this particular writing project. I can listen to them uninterrupted during keyboard time, and also play them at night, to help seed my subconscious mind with “memories” of events in the Parallel Universe of Fiction.

Check out Kevin MacLeod’s site, and see what he’s got that can help smooth your creative path in the world of Written Artistry.

 

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It was a Dark and Stormy Night. | IRISH FIREBRANDS: A Novel ~ and Other Works by Christine Plouvier, Indie Author

Inviting all Indie Authors to stroll with me down memory lane….

It was a Dark and Stormy Night. | IRISH FIREBRANDS: A Novel ~ and Other Works by Christine Plouvier, Indie Author

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It was a Dark and Stormy Night.

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents, except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness.
~ Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Paul Clifford

375px-Edward_George_Earle_Lytton_Bulwer_Lytton,_1st_Baron_Lytton_by_Henry_William_Pickersgill

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, by Henry William Pickersgill

It rains a lot in Ireland, so it rains a lot in Irish Firebrands, too – and yes, there’s even a stormy night chapter….

How often does nature (storms, earthquakes, dawn, dusk, stars, moon, sun, wind, animals, plants, etc.) appear in your fiction?

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